Goat milk soap

Photography by Ashley Fetner
Goat milk soap

The Carsuo family has been working their southwest Randolph County farm for about 20 years. They share the farm with their goats, horse, cat, cows, rabbits, chickens, quail and guinea fowl. In addition to caring for the farm animals, they grow vegetables, blueberries, figs, apples and pears. And they make soap.

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The farm’s Alpine goats were producing more milk than the family could use, and a friend’s daughter had developed a skin condition that nothing seemed to help relieve. So Bernie Caruso, putting his chemistry degree to work, began making soap with the goat milk and asked the friends to try it. The soap relieved the young woman’s symptoms, so Bernie and Ellen Caruso sent the soap to family and friends to sample. Eleanor’s Finest Goat Milk Soap was born.

Goat milk contains enzymes, amino acids and other nutrients good for our skin. Goat milk is high in vitamin A that is necessary to repair damaged skin tissue and help maintain skin health. Fat is also important for soap making, and goat milk cream helps to boost the moisturizing quality of the soap. This helps with dry or sensitive skin and in such skin conditions as eczema and psoriasis.

The soap is made entirely from scratch and contains goat milk, eight plant oils, Shea butter, essential oils, fragrances and mineral color. There are 50 fragrances as well as “fragrance free.”

One customer’s e-mail said, “Winter itch is just as bad for my scalp as for the rest of my body, if not worse. I lathered my hands with my goat milk soap and massaged it onto my head and then rinsed. I want you to know that the itching has virtually disappeared.”

You can find Eleanor’s Finest at the Piedmont Triad Farmer’s Market in Colfax, or online at EleanorsFinest.com.

About the Author

Kay and Ashley Fetner live in Asheboro and are members of Randolph EMC. ashleyfetnerportraits.com

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